resume

27
Sep

I'm Published. Now What?

—from the PI's desk

We received an inquiry from an undergrad about how to use their co-authorship on applications (edited here for brevity and to maintain anonymity):

I have been working on research projects for a year now. Just this summer I have received a co-authorship on a study. I was wondering, how do I record this information or something along those lines to be used for graduate school applications?

Dear Undergrad In The Lab,

Congratulations on your publication!

The Quality of Your Resume Matters. Even for a Volunteer Position.

A few years ago, I interviewed a student who didn't put much effort into making his resume look like a professional document. As he was only a second-year student, I didn’t expect his resume to be packed with awards and accomplishments—after all I knew that an in-depth research experience would give him the opportunities to do just that. But I did expect a basic level of professionalism.

What’s in a Name? Resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV)?

A student asked us to help her understand the difference between a resume and a CV. She had read “a bunch of stuff online” and was confused what she should name her document. She said, “ I’m a bio engineering major but am applying for volunteering for a job in an art museum.” So which is it a resume or CV?

—from the PI’s Desk

Early in my career, a tenured professor told me, "If you sneeze, and it's a good sneeze, keep track of it." At the time I doubted it would matter but I've been forever grateful that I followed his advice.

Writing down noteworthy (and seemingly insignificant) accomplishments, skills, and activities while the details are fresh in your mind can make all the difference when you need to update a Resume or CV for a scholarship, volunteer, job, or program application.