Welcome to Undergrad in the Lab!

Undergraduate research can be incredibly rewarding, but where do you start and how do you succeed? Navigating this unfamiliar territory is not easy. Here you will find advice on how to find a research position, and how to get the most out of your experience.

Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought.

— Albert Szent-Györgi (1893-1986) U. S. biochemist.
27
Sep

I'm Published. Now What?

—from the PI's desk

We received an inquiry from an undergrad about how to use their co-authorship on applications (edited here for brevity and to maintain anonymity):

I have been working on research projects for a year now. Just this summer I have received a co-authorship on a study. I was wondering, how do I record this information or something along those lines to be used for graduate school applications?

Dear Undergrad In The Lab,

Congratulations on your publication!

21
Sep

How You Doin'?

— from the Researcher's bench

One of the reassuring things about taking an undergraduate lab course is knowing exactly what you need to do to earn the letter grade you want. For most instructional labs, you can calculate your grade at anytime to know whether or not you’re excelling, and opt for the extra credit assignments if needed.

Well Wishes and Safe Travels

Warning: We're about to brag.

Today, one of our former undergrads, Madi, heads to Oxford University to start her next adventure as a graduate student specializing in immunology.

When she finishes her grad degree (it will take about one year), she'll head back the USA to attend medical school. Talk about an incredible personal year--living abroad, doing research, and earning another degree.

When possible, Set Target Dates Instead of Deadlines for Research Goals

Sometimes researchers, particularly those who are new in a lab, try to set deadlines for all research goals. Although progress is important, and so is setting goals each semester, not every goal needs a deadline.

Your Week 3 Check Up

A few weeks into the new semester (or quarter if applicable) is the perfect time to do a quick self-assesment. Ask yourself this simple question: "Am I finding enough time to study?"

If you do this self-assesment before your first set of exams, you still have time to make some changes, if needed. If you wait too long, it might be too late to do much about it, and will only cause you more stress.

05
Sep

I Need a Reference Letter in Two Years. Should I Ask Now?

—from the PI's desk

This week we received a request for help (edited here for brevity and to maintain anonymity):

Hi Undergrad in the Lab, I have a question for you. I recently finished a 4 month summer research project. I understand the importance of references and I was thinking of asking my supervisor for a reference for professional school but I'm planning on applying in 2-3 years. Should I be asking for a reference letter now while they still remember me or is that a bad idea?

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