Welcome to Undergrad in the Lab!

Undergraduate research can be incredibly rewarding, but where do you start and how do you succeed? Navigating this unfamiliar territory is not easy. Here you will find advice on how to find a research position, and how to get the most out of your experience.

Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought.

— Albert Szent-Györgi (1893-1986) U. S. biochemist.
05
Jun

5 Survival Tips for Summer Research

—from the Researcher’s bench

After publishing the blog post “10 Things to Expect” I received requests for some summer research “survival tips.” I’m happy to provide the same tips I give my new undergrads at the start of a summer experience.

Realistic To-do Lists Help Avoid Burnout

One of the biggest mistakes scientists at all levels make is planning to do too much in too little time. We all believe things will go faster, be easier, and take less time to accomplish than they actually do. Setting research goals is important, but so is adjusting them when needed. NEVER let yourself feel that you failed for reevaluating what is reasonable to accomplish. It's simply part of EVERYONE'S research experience.

Getting the Most out of Your Time

What you do in the lab when you aren’t doing research matters. A lot.

To extract the most from your undergrad research experience, you'll need to make your time in the lab matter.

Read the Troubleshooting Section Before You Need It

Every research kit contains a protocol manual with a troubleshooting section that explains the most common mistakes made with the kit at the research bench. If the kit procedure fails, the first thing most scientists do is turn to the troubleshooting section to determine if the reason could have been Operator Error.

Where is the What, Now?

Over the course of your undergrad research experience, you'll have opportunities to develop a strong sense of self-reliance. The more you choose to do so the more rewarding research experience you'll have, and the stronger your recommendation letters from your research professor will be.

Set Goals and Create Outlines Every Semester

Even if your research advisor doesn't require it, it's important to keep track of your research goals and project objectives. At the start of each semester, make a list of three things you want to learn or accomplish. After, create an outline of your undergrad research project. Include the main objectives & the techniques you’ll use.

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