Welcome to Undergrad in the Lab!

Undergraduate research can be incredibly rewarding, but where do you start and how do you succeed? Navigating this unfamiliar territory is not easy. Here you will find advice on how to find a research position, and how to get the most out of your experience.

Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought.

— Albert Szent-Györgi (1893-1986) U. S. biochemist.

— from the Researcher's bench and PI's desk

For Students: how Getting In: The Insider’s Guide to Finding the Perfect Undergraduate Research Experience will make all the difference in your search and help you prepare for life as an Undergrad In The Lab

21
Aug

Why Choose Research?

Why Choose Research?

—from the PI’s Desk and the Researcher's bench

If you’re considering undergraduate research, you probably already know some of the potential benefits: looks good on your resume, can help you explore a potential career path, and can lead to recommendation letters.

However, an undergraduate research experience can also support your long-term professional goals (regardless of what your career path turns out to be), foster personal development, and give you an academic edge. Here are only a few of the advantages to participating in an in-depth research experience.

Two Reasons To Present Your Research Every Chance You Get!

There are many reasons you should put yourself though the special kind of stress that accompanies presenting your research. This post will cover two.

1) To build your resume or CV. Whether you apply for a fellowship, scholarship, or med/grad/prof school, the more presentations you have to list the better off you'll be. Most selection committees rank research presentations as a quality-rich activity.

Predicting the Future

Before staring an experiment, you should be able to predict what the results will be if you're successful, and what the results might be if you're not. Although you won't be able to anticipate every possible outcome for every experiment, knowing the probable ones before you start will help you understand and correctly interpret the results you get. Not only will this help you become a more independent researcher, but also it will help you make a more meaningful connection with your project.

Even If You Know What's in it, Label It!

When you're in a rush to wrap up your lab day, it may be temping to save a little time and not label a tube, bottle, or component--after all you know what it is. But that is a sure recipe for disaster.

Hinge Up, Down, or Random?

When placing your tubes in the microcentrifuge, If your research supervisor doesn’t have a preference, then always place the tubes hinge up. If you develop this habit, it will serve you well. For example, if you have a pellet after the spin, you’ll always know that it will be opposite the hinge. If the pellet is hard to see, or instead of a pellet there is a streak of material on the side of the tube, you’ll know the side of the to avoid when pipetting off excess liquid.

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